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Petals of Wisdom: Thoughts for Aug 2000

Collected by Ti.nh Tue^.


1

Well proclaimed by the Exalted One is the Norm, a thing to be seen in this very life, not a thing of time, inviting to come and see, leading onward, to be realized by them that are wise, each for himself. (The Book of the Kindred Saying IV, p. 211)

 

2

Like a lake which is deep, clear and calm, the wise after listening to the teaching (Dhamma) become serene. (Dhammapada, v 82)

 

3

When you are gathered together, monks, there are two things to be done: either talk about dhamma or the ariyan silence. (The Collection of the Middle Length Sayings I, p. 205)

 

4

For the pure every day is auspicious, for the pure every day is holy,
For the pure of bright deeds there is ever the practice of (good) custom.
(The Collection of the Middle Length Sayings I. p. 49f)

 

5

Herein, monks, you should train yourselves thus: ‘Neither will our minds become perverted nor will we utter an evil speech, but kindly and compassionate will we dwell, with a mind of friendliness, void of hatred; and we will dwell having suffused that person with a mind of friendliness; and, beginning with him, we will dwell having suffused the whole world with a mind of friendliness that is far-reaching, widespread, immeasurable, without enmity, without malevolence.’ This is how you must train yourselves, monks. (The Collection of the Middle Length Sayings I, p. 164)

 

6

Whose give rein to passion, in this world
Not passion-freed, in sense-desires delighting,
These oft and oft subject to birth and eld,
Bondsmen to craving, down the current go.
Therefore the sage, here fixed in mindfulness,
Not following after lusts and evil deeds,
Tho’he may suffer, should abandon passions.
‘Tis he, men say, who’ gainst the current goes.
(The Book of the Gradual Saying II, 5f)

 

7

The Kalamas of Kesaputta said this to the Exalted One:

_ ‘Sir, certain recluses and brahmins come to Kesaputta. As to their own view, they proclaim and expound it in full: but as to the view of others, they abuse it, revile it, depreciate and cripple it. When we listen to them, sir, we have doubt and wavering as to which of these worthies is speaking truth and which speaks false-hood.’

_ ‘Yes, Kalamas, you may well doubt, you may well waver. In a doubtful matter wavering does arise. Now look you, Kalamas. Be not misled by report or tradition or hearsay. be not misled by proficiency in the collections, nor by mere logic or inference, nor after considering reasons, nor after reflection on and approval of some theory, nor because it fits becoming, nor out of respect for a recluse (who holds it). But, Kalamas, when you know for yourselves: These things are unprofitable, these things are blameworthy, these things are censured by the intelligent; these things, when performed and undertaken, conduce to loss and sorrow, _ then indeed do ye reject them, Kalamas. But if at any tine ye know of yourselves: These thins are profitable, they are blameless, they are praised by the intelligent: these things, when performed and undertaken, conduce to profit and happiness, _ then, Kalamas, do ye, having undertaken them, abide therein.’ (The Book of the Gradual Saying I. p. 171f)

 

8

From lust or malice or delusion born,
A deed, or great or small, performed by fools
Just here is felt: no other ground is seen
For its fulfilment. Wise monks should eschew
lust, malice and delusion for this cause,
Get knowledge and forsake all ways of woe.
(The Book of the Gradual Saying I. 119)

 

9

He comes to know: Formerly I had greed: that was evil. Now it exists no more: that is good. Formerly I had malice: that was evil. Now it exists no more: that is good. Formerly I was deluded: now delusion exists no more: that is good. thus in this very life he is free from craving, he is released, he has become cool: he, of himself, abides in experience of bliss, by becoming Brahma. (The Book of the Gradual Saying I. 178)

 

10

E’en as the tortoise in its own shell’s shelter
Withdraws its limbs, so may the brother holding,
Composed, intent, thoughts in his mind arisen,
Leaning on naught, injuring ne’er his neighbor,
From evil freed wholly, speak ill of no man.
(The Book of the Kindred Saying IV, p. 113)

 

11

The destruction of lust, the destruction of hatred, the destruction of illusion, is called Nibbana. (The Book of the Kindred Saying IV, p. 170)

 

12

Few among men reach the other shore (Nibbaana); all the others only run up and down on this shore. (Dhammapada, v 85)

 

13

Monks, these two things are causes of the arising of right view. What two? A voice from another and thorough attention. (The Book of the Gradual Saying I. 79)

 

14

Better than a hundred years in the life of a person who does not comprehend the Noble Dhamma (Dhammamuttama ), is a day in the life of one who comprehends the Noble Dhamma. (Dhammapada, v 115)

 

15

Monks, these three preliminaries are to be carried out by a yeoman farmer. What three? Herein, monks, the yeoman farmer must first of all well plough and harrow his field, and when these things are done he must sow his seed at the proper season. Having done this he lets in the water and lets it out again in proper season. These are the three preliminaries.

In the same way, monks, these three preliminaries are to be carried out by a monk. What three? The undertaking of the training in the higher morality, in the higher thought, in the higher insight. These are the three. (The Book of the Gradual Saying I. 209)

 


Updated: 1-8-2000

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