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Petals of Wisdom: Thoughts for Dec 2000

Collected by Ti.nh Tue^.


1

By oneself indeed is evil done and be oneself is one defiled; by oneself is evil not done and by oneself is one purified. Purity and impurity depend entirely on oneself; no one can purify another. (Dhammapada, v. 165).

 

2

Monks, when in a monk evil practice in body is abandoned and good practice in body developed; when evil practice in speech … in thought is abandoned and good practice in speech and thought developed, and when right view is developed, that monk has no fears about the life to come, about death. (The Book of the Gradual Saying II, p. 123)

 

3

It is easy to do things that are bad and unbeneficial to oneself, but it is, indeed, most difficult to do things that are beneficial and good. (Dhammapada, v. 163).

 

4

In this case a certain person makes his bed and lodging in the lonely glades and solitude of a forest, and at the same time thinks unworldly thoughts, thoughts not malicious, not harmful. Thus a person is subdued both in body and in mind. (The Book of the Gradual Saying II, p.141)

 

5

Hard to gain is birth as man; hard is the life of mortals; hard to get is the opportunity of hearing the Ariya Dhamma (Teaching of the Buddhas); hard it is for a Buddha to appear. (Dhammapada, v. 182)

 

6

Truthful speech, speech not spiteful, mild speech and mantra speech are the four right practices. (The Book of the Gradual Saying II, p. 144)

 

7

Not to revile, not to do any harm, to practise restraint according to the Fundamental Instructions for the bhikkhus, to be moderate in taking food, to ewell in a secluded place, to devote oneself to higher concentration _ this is the Teaching of the Buddhas. (Dhammapada, v. 185)

 

8

Those recluses and brabmins who practise utter purity in body, speech and thought, who live in utter purity are capable of knowledge and insight, of the enlightenment which is unsurpassed. (The Book of the Gradual Saying II, 213)

 

9

Not by a shower of coins can sensual desires be satiated; sensual desires give little pleasure and are fraught with evil consequences (dukkha). Knowing this, the wise man, who is the disciple of the Buddha, does not find delight even in the pleasures of the devas, but rejoices in the cessation of craving (Nibbana). (Dhammapada, v. 186, 187)

 

10

The alms-giver, when come to deva-state, surpasses the non-giver in five ways: in divine life-span, beauty, happiness, honour and power. (The Book of the Gradual Saying III, 24)

 

11

It is hard to find the noblest of men; he is not born everywhere nor in every clan. To whatever clan such a wise man is born, that clan prospers. (Dhammapada, v. 193)

 

12

Where ageing brings no old age that state is not to be got to by recluse or godly man, by deva, Mara or Brahma , nor by anyone in the world. Where sickening brings no sickness… nor dying death… nor wasting destruction… nor ending brings the end that state is not to be got to by recluse or godly man, by deva, Mara or Brahma , nor by anyone in the world. (The Book of the Gradual Saying III, 45)

 

13

Indeed we live very happily, not hating anyone among those who hate; among men who hate we live without hating anyone. (Dhammapada, v. 197)

 

14

Rare in the world is a person who is grateful and thankful. (The Book of the Gradual Saying III, 127)

 

15

Conquest begets enmity; the conquered live in misery; the peaceful live happily having renounced conquest and defeat. (Dhammapada, v. 201)

 


Updated: 1-12-2000

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