English Section

      Buddhism Today 

Vietnamese Section

   

...... ... .  . .  .  .
Petals of Wisdom: Thoughts for April 2001

Collected by Ti.nh Tue^.


 

1

The others know not that in this (quarrel) we perish. Those of them who realise it have their quarrels calmed thereby. (Dhammapada, v. 6)

 

2

What is that Way, what that practice? It is this very Ariyan eightfold way; to wit, right view, right thought, right speech, right action, right living, right effort, right mindfulness, and right concentration. (Samyutta-Nikaya V, p. 2; The Book of the Kindred Sayings V, p. 6).

 

3

Continually increases the glory of him who is energetic, mindful, pure in deed, discriminative self-controlled, right-living, and heedful. (Dhammapada, v. 24)

 

4

The restraint of lust, the restraint of hatred, and the restraint of illusion imply the realm of Nibbana. By it is meant the destruction of the asavas. (Samyutta-Nikaya V, p. 8; The Book of the Kindred Sayings V, p. 7).

 

5

The mind is very hard to check, swift, flits wherever it lists, - the control thereof is good; a controlled mind is conducive to happiness. (Dhammapada, v. 35)

 

6

That which is the destruction of lust, the destruction of hatred, the destruction of illusion, that is called "the deathless." This same Ariyan eightfold way is the way to the deathless; to wit, right view, right thought, right speech, right action, right living, right effort, right mindfulness, and right concentration. (Samyutta-Nikaya V, p. 8; The Book of the Kindred Sayings V, p. 7).

 

7

What neither mother, nor father, nor any other relative could do, - a well-directed mind does, and thereby elevates one. (Dhammapada, v. 43)

 

8

There are these three conceits, namely, the ‘better than I’ conceit, the ‘equal am I’, the ‘worse am I’ conceit. It is for the full comprehension of these three conceits, that the Ariyan eightfold way is to be cultivated. (Samyutta-Nikaya V, p. 56; The Book of the Kindred Sayings V, p. 44f).

 

9

The man who gathers flowers (of sensual pleasures), whose mind is distracted, and who is insatiate in desires, - the Destroyer brings under this sway. (Dhammapada, v. 48)

 

10

The limb of wisdom that is mindfulness, investigation, energy, zest, tranquillity, concentration, and equanimity is the way for crushing Mara’s host. (Samyutta-Nikaya V, p. 99; The Book of the Kindred Sayings V, p. 83)

 

11

Long is the night to the wakeful, long is the road to him who is weary, long is Sa saara to the foolish who know not the Sublime Truth. (Dhammapada, v. 60)

 

12

Monks, ye must observe the station of mindfulness which means "I’ll ward myself." Ye must observe that which means: I’ll ward another." It is by warding self, monks, that one wards another. It is by warding another that one wards himself. (Samyutta-Nikaya V, p. 169; The Book of the Kindred Sayings V, p. 149)

 

13

A fool who thinks that he is a fool is for that very reason a wise man. The fool who thinks that he is wise is called a fool indeed. (Dhammapada, v. 63).

 

14

And how, monks, by warding another does one ward himself? it is by forbearance, by harmlessness, by goodwill, by compassion towards him. That, monks, is how he wards himself. (Samyutta-Nikaya V, p. 169; The Book of the Kindred Sayings V, p. 149)

 

15

This is the one sole way that leads to the and grief, o the destruction of woe and lamentation, to the winning of the Method, to the realizing of Nibbana, to wit: the four stations of mindfulness. (Samyutta-Nikaya V, p. 184; The Book of the Kindred Sayings V, p. 162)

 


Updated: 1-4-2001

Return to "Quotes of the month"

Top of Page